Fa, la, la, la, la…

How about this tree to bring out a little Christmas spirit for us gardeners? This tropical beauty made up of bromeliads and ferns is stacked 15′ high and is located at Mulhalls in Omaha, NE. It’s a colorful site and one tree that needs no ornaments.

“Bromeliads are native to Central and South America and can be found living everywhere from sea level to the highest mountaintops. Some bromeliad species live in the desert, some prefer swamps, some grow rooted in soil, and some grow as epiphytes on other plants.” Mulhalls

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Mulhalls features three more familiar genera of bromeliads; Aechmea, Tillandsia, Guzmania, Vriesea, and Neoregelia on their blogView more on these three species here.

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See this beauty in person at Mulhalls located at 3615 N 120th Street, Omaha, NE.

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If you remember this blog, I purchased a bromeliad at this time last year. It was blooming at the time and already had three pups on the plant. One of my favorite YouTubers, Homestead Brooklyn, wrote about her bromeliad right after so I knew what to expect. It is a very easy house plant to care for and in my opinion, is very forgiving on both water and light requirements.

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Mulhalls says “after blooming is done, look for “pups,” or baby plants appearing around the base of the original plant. When these pups get big enough to form their own rosette, place the entire pot in an air-tight plastic bag with a ripe apple for about a week. The apple releases ethylene gas that should trigger the formation of another flower stalk.”

I think I might try to separate my pups from the mother plant and let them recover from a transplant before I try to force a bloom. Below is what my plant looks like now.

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I’m a big fan of bromeliads and would recommend them to all beginner plant parents! Have you every tried to separate a bromeliad and its pups? Please comment any advice you have below!

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